Archive

November 2016

Blog | November 30, 2016

What's next for vehicle fuel economy?

The Obama administration has been a great champion of higher fuel economy and corresponding reductions in vehicles’ emissions of greenhouse gases. There’s no reason to expect continuity in this area from the new administration, and an advisor to president-elect Trump has indicated that fuel economy and emissions standards are on their radar.

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Blog | November 28, 2016

Intelligent efficiency is surging: let’s talk about it

This is not how your grandparents saved energy. They may have told you to turn off the lights or put on a sweater. They offered good advice, but times have changed beyond what they probably ever imagined. Technology is making it possible to do so much more. It gives us “intelligent efficiency,” now moving faster than ever.

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Blog | November 21, 2016

The Clean Power Plan and energy efficiency: where do we go from here?

As another round of global climate talks has concluded, many observers wonder whether the 2016 election means the end of greenhouse gas regulation in the United States. More specifically, what happens to the Clean Power Plan?

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Blog | November 21, 2016

How to create big opportunities to save energy for small businesses

Given the importance of small businesses to our national economy, ACEEE has examined successful utility program practices in the small commercial segment. We find there are still significant energy efficiency opportunities. Our new paper describes effective program strategies.

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Blog | November 13, 2016

How residential utility programs could reach more diverse households

Many energy efficiency programs are designed around measures rather than people. These “untargeted” programs focus on meeting energy savings and cost-effectiveness goals, and are ostensibly impartial about the characteristics of the households that receive the offering.

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Blog | November 10, 2016

What do the 2016 election results mean for energy efficiency?

Now that the hard-fought 2016 election is over, I think it is useful to consider its impact on energy efficiency policy. No doubt, a lot of uncertainty remains because of President-elect Donald Trump’s lack of specificity on many issues. Yet given the bipartisan, good-for-business appeal of energy efficiency, I see potential paths forward and work to be done.

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