Archive

June 2018

Blog Post | June 20, 2018

Our rural initiative aims to jumpstart rural America’s untapped potential for energy

Saving energy saves money everywhere — in cities, suburbs, small towns, and remote, sparsely populated areas. But for those living in the 75% of the United States considered to be rural, energy efficiency programs can be hard to come by. That is why ACEEE is launching a new rural research initiative, aimed at understanding the unique energy efficiency needs of those living in sparsely populated areas and finding solutions to the challenges they face.

Read More
Blog Post | June 19, 2018

Tune in to the 2018 World Cup of Energy Efficiency!

As the world remains fixated on one of the most-anticipated sporting events of the year, ACEEE will release the results of its own World Cup. Will Germany defend its 2014 World Cup title and its 2016 International Energy Efficiency Scorecard triumph? The wait is almost over.

Read More
Blog Post | June 13, 2018

Cities are laying the foundation for a robust and equitable energy efficiency workforce

As US cities push forward to meet their clean energy goals, they will need a strong, capable energy efficiency workforce to make critical energy-saving upgrades and investments. Our new report, Through the Local Government Lens: Developing the Energy Efficiency Workforce, shows how cities can take an active role in growing the workforce and extend its benefits to underserved communities.

Read More
Blog Post | June 12, 2018

Car Buyers Rank Fuel Economy as a Top Priority

The Trump administration is expected to propose any day a rollback of greenhouse gas and fuel economy standards, based partly on the notion that Americans are not interested in efficient vehicles.

Read More
Blog Post | June 5, 2018

Program administrators can stay ahead of the curve with high-efficiency air conditioners

With as many as four billion additional air conditioning units expected to be in use by 2050, the value of highly efficient air conditioners will only increase over the next few decades. The International Energy Agency (IEA) recently predicted that as power plants generate more electricity for these units, greenhouse gas emissions could nearly double from 1.25 billion tons in 2016 to 2.28 billion tons in 2050.

Read More