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Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)

Press Release | May 1, 2017

Congress Takes Promising Step on Budget

Statement by Maggie Molina, Senior  Director of Policy

We welcome the new congressional budget deal as a promising sign of bipartisan cooperation. The deal maintains funding for essential programs that work with the private sector to create jobs, spur economic growth, and transform energy waste into wealth.

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Blog | March 22, 2017

Don’t Tread on ENERGY STAR

In its recent budget outline, the new administration proposes to eliminate funding for the ENERGY STAR® program. An earlier leaked draft suggested that the private sector should take over the program and that a government role is not needed. Others have suggested that ACEEE should run the program. We strongly disagree.

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Press Release | March 16, 2017

Trump’s Budget Proposal Will Raise Energy Bills and Kill Jobs

A statement by Steve Nadel, ACEEE Executive Director

The federal budget outline released by the Trump administration today takes a meat cleaver to energy efficiency programs, cutting both muscle and bone. If enacted, these cuts would raise Americans’ energy bills and kill jobs.

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Blog | March 4, 2016

The long road to today's CAFE standards

Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for cars and light trucks, first adopted in 1975 in the wake of the OPEC oil embargo, resulted in a doubling of average new vehicle fuel economy a decade later. Following that period of rapid advance were two decades of stagnant fuel economy standards.

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Blog | September 14, 2015

Can energy-intensive manufacturers be winners under the Clean Power Plan?

There is a concern that any new environmental regulation can hurt the bottom lines of energy-intensive manufacturers. In the case of the EPA Clean Power Plan, states that comply with the rule by investing in energy efficiency will find the opposite is likely to be true: their businesses will be more productive and their economies will grow.

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Blog | September 10, 2014

Working government is not an oxymoron: How savings from federal agency actions on energy efficiency could save us $2.6 trillion

“Washington, D.C.” has become a synonym for “dysfunction” in the last few years, prompting many who care about energy efficiency policy to turn their attention to states. But that view is due to a focus on Congress and on President Obama’s interactions with Congress, where the epithet is mostly deserved. If you look beyond the white marble dome to the federal agencies, there is lots of action on energy efficiency.

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Blog | September 4, 2014

CHP should also be part of EPA’s Clean Power Plan building blocks

EPA’s Clean Power Plan outlines four building blocks, each of which represent a category of measures that states can use to meet the first-ever federal regulation for reducing carbon dioxide from existing power plants.

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Blog | April 25, 2014

Test drive: results from first year of greenhouse gas emissions program

Data on manufacturers’ compliance with the first year (model year 2012) of greenhouse gas emissions standards for light duty vehicles is now available from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. The bottom line is that manufacturers as a whole have met the standards with a bit of room to spare.

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Press Release | December 6, 2013

Energy Efficiency Must Be a Key Emissions Reduction Strategy, Say Leading Efficiency Groups

Energy efficiency increases need to be a key strategy in achieving carbon emissions goals, according to joint comments submitted to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) by the Alliance to Save Energy and the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE), in response to the agency's forthcoming new standards for existing power plants.

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Blog | October 11, 2013

Reading the Tea Leaves: End-Use Efficiency and the Clean Air Act

[no-glossary]In late September, the ether was all abuzz with news of EPA’s proposed New Source Performance Standards for regulating carbon dioxide emissions from new power plants. Since then, many attempts have been made to read the tea leaves in hopes of predicting what approach EPA will take to regulate carbon dioxide emissions from existing power plants—the big fish in terms of potential pollution benefits (86% of U.S.

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