Terms

National Policy

Blog | February 1, 2017

Wading into the Trump era of energy efficiency

Barely one week into the new administration, we are far enough into the water to see dim shapes of the future ahead—some look more like sharks, some like rocks. Here’s some of what we see as of now:

Read More
Blog | January 4, 2017

2017 is looking like a good year for energy efficiency as investments grow

As the new year begins, we expect 2017 will bring increased investments in energy efficiency and other efforts to save energy.

Read More
Blog | December 29, 2016

Five new energy-saving standards from Barack Obama, but Donald Trump will get the final word

Yesterday, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued five new efficiency standards, culminating a decade of energy efficiency progress that began under President George W. Bush. The new standards, the last of many developed during the Obama administration, will save consumers money, help meet the nation’s energy needs and reduce environmentally harmful emissions, including greenhouse gases. However, each of these new standards must clear one more hurdle before they are truly complete, which means the Trump administration will get the final word on this last batch of Obama-era standards.

Read More
Blog | December 7, 2016

Can the US cut its energy use in half by 2050? Yes, but we will have to double down on our efforts.

Five years ago, ACEEE found that energy efficiency could reduce projected 2050 US energy use by 40–60%. As a result, ACEEE established a strategic goal to reduce projected 2050 energy use by 50%. We thought it was time to check on our progress and ask whether our goal still seems reasonable. We find that energy use has been stable in recent years, reversing historical growth, a very positive development that is due in significant part to increasing our energy efficiency.

Read More
Blog | November 21, 2016

The Clean Power Plan and energy efficiency: where do we go from here?

As another round of global climate talks has concluded, many observers wonder whether the 2016 election means the end of greenhouse gas regulation in the United States. More specifically, what happens to the Clean Power Plan?

Read More
Blog | November 10, 2016

What do the 2016 election results mean for energy efficiency?

Now that the hard-fought 2016 election is over, I think it is useful to consider its impact on energy efficiency policy. No doubt, a lot of uncertainty remains because of President-elect Donald Trump’s lack of specificity on many issues. Yet given the bipartisan, good-for-business appeal of energy efficiency, I see potential paths forward and work to be done.

Read More
Press Release | October 25, 2016

EPA Urged to Level the Playing Field for Energy Efficiency in the Clean Power Plan

More Than 50 Groups Join ACEEE in Clean Energy Incentive Plan Proposal

Read More
Blog | September 15, 2016

Energy efficiency should be placed on a level playing field in the Clean Energy Incentive Program

Despite the fact that energy efficiency is generally the least-cost option for states looking to comply with the Clean Power Plan, it has yet to be fully considered as a strategy for the Clean Energy Incentive Program (CEIP). This could result in reduced investment in energy efficiency which would mean increased electric costs and less money in the hands of communities.

Read More
Blog | September 8, 2016

Studies suggest that past rates of energy efficiency improvement can be sustained

Can efficiency improvements achieved in past decades be sustained in the future?  How much impact does the rebound effect have on energy efficiency potential out to 2030, or even 2050?

Read More
Blog | August 3, 2016

Mobile homes move toward efficiency

Do you know which government in the United States is the biggest laggard on energy codes for homes? The federal government. But that’s about to change.

Manufactured homes and the “HUD Code”

Although building codes are mostly set by states, the federal government sets codes for manufactured homes (sometimes called mobile homes) because the factory does not always know where a home will end up. Manufacturers shipped 70,519 homes in 2015, more than the number of single-family homes built in any state except Texas.

Read More