Terms

Light Duty Fuel Economy

Blog | May 24, 2016

To check progress toward 2025 fuel economy targets, we took a look at the Ford F-150

Recent press accounts of automobile fuel economy trends express concern that light trucks won’t be able to keep up with rising fuel economy (CAFE) standards.

Read More
Blog | March 4, 2016

The long road to today's CAFE standards

Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards for cars and light trucks, first adopted in 1975 in the wake of the OPEC oil embargo, resulted in a doubling of average new vehicle fuel economy a decade later. Following that period of rapid advance were two decades of stagnant fuel economy standards.

Read More
Press Release | January 27, 2016

More Electric Cars than Ever on Greenest Vehicles List

Electric Vehicles Nab 9 out of Top 12 Spots in ACEEE’s Environmental Vehicle Rankings 

Washington, DC—Despite a tumultuous year for the automotive industry, manufacturers have continued to offer exciting technology options for a growing vehicle market. Today at greenercars.org, the American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy released its 19th annual comprehensive environmental ratings for vehicles.

Read More
Blog | January 8, 2016

Cars got quicker, more powerful by weight, and more fuel efficient in the last 40 years.

Over the past 40 years, light-duty vehicles in the United States have achieved remarkable gains in both fuel economy and performance. The graph below shows average miles per gallon, power-to-weight ratio, and 0-to-60 acceleration time of new cars and light trucks since the late 1970s. Fuel economy improved dramatically from 1975 to 1987, driven by the original Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) standards, which were adopted in 1975 in response to the 1973 oil embargo by Arab states.

Read More
Blog | December 22, 2015

Vehicle fuel economy and greenhouse gas standards are working well, but could fall short of climate goals

The latest news from the EPA on light-duty vehicle fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions is…complicated. There’s good news and not-so-good news, and the array of factors that figure into EPA’s accounts of these matters is mind-boggling for those not tuned into the fine points.

Read More
Blog | October 5, 2015

Phase 2 proposal drives truck fuel efficiency forward, but engine standards need a boost

New fuel efficiency and greenhouse gas emissions standards for heavy-duty vehicles and engines, proposed this summer, have just run the gauntlet of public comment on their way to final adoption next year. As proposed, these Phase 2 standards would provide major gains in fuel efficiency for heavy-duty vehicles by 2027.

Read More
Press Release | June 18, 2015

ACEEE Statement on National Research Council Fuel Economy Study

ACEEE executive director Steven Nadel made this statement on the report Cost, Effectiveness and Deployment of Fuel Economy Technologies for Light-Duty Vehicles released today by the National Research Council, the operating arm of the National Academy of Sciences and the National Academy of Engineering:

Read More
Blog | June 18, 2015

2025 CAFE standards under the microscope

A report released today by the National Research Council (NRC) provides important input to the upcoming “midterm evaluation” of fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards now in place.

Read More
Blog | March 26, 2015

Implementation of clean vehicle standards: How’s it going?

Standards cutting greenhouse gas emissions from cars and light trucks and raising fuel economy are among the biggest environmental achievements of the Obama administration. The standards are projected to save consumers hundreds of billions of dollars in fuel expenditures over the next decade. In the process, they are helping to shape the US and global auto industries by establishing an expectation of continuing technological progress toward high efficiency, low-emitting vehicles.

Read More
Blog | January 21, 2015

Fuel economy standards will propel America’s vehicle technology, if we let them.

In his State of the Union address, President Obama rightly pointed to a thriving domestic auto industry as a bright spot in the U.S. economy. It’s a good time to recall that the government’s 2008-2009 intervention on behalf of GM and Chrysler played a big role in that outcome, as did energy efficiency.

Read More