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Light Duty Fuel Economy

Blog Post | August 28, 2012

New Vehicle Standards to Achieve Major Fuel Savings and Emissions Reductions

The Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency today finalized federal car and light truck fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards for model years 2017 to 2025. The standards, together with those previously adopted for model years 2012 to 2016, mean an 80 percent increase in fuel economy for the average model year 2025 vehicle from the 2011 CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) requirement of 27.6 miles per gallon.    

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Press Release | June 26, 2012

Improving Vehicle Fuel Economy to Create 570,000 U.S. Jobs

Largest Jump in CAFE Standards in a Generation is a Driving Force for Economic Growth

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Blog Post | April 23, 2012

Make Every Day Earth Day with Some Quick Energy-Saving Tips

Yesterday was the 42nd anniversary of Earth Day, but as we are often reminded, every day is Earth Day. And it’s not too late to do your part to reduce pollution by saving energy, while at the same time saving money by cutting down your utility and gas bills. Spring is a great time to make some changes around your home; here are some simple things you can do today:

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Press Release | January 24, 2012

ACEEE Submits Testimony on EPA and NHTSA Light Duty Fuel Economy Standards

Standards Would Deliver Fuel Savings That Would Stimulate the Economy and Job Growth.

 

Washington, D.C.—Proposed EPA/NHTSA fuel economy rules will lead to cost-effective consumer investments in fuel-efficient vehicles that will in turn stimulate economic activity and create an estimated net gain of 300,000 to 400,000 jobs per year on average over the period 2017 to 2025. The new rule will raise average new car and light truck fuel economy to 49.6 miles per gallon by 2025.

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Blog Post | September 29, 2011

Cash for Clunkers: A Missed Opportunity

This summer marked the two-year anniversary of the Consumer Assistance to Recycle and Save (CARS) program, more fondly known as “Cash for Clunkers.” We know that the program provided consumers with a hefty chunk of money to trade in their older, inefficient vehicles for more efficient new ones. We also know that it provided a boost to carmakers and the economy by stimulating sales. Two years on, what more can we learn?

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