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Press Release | May 10, 2017

Cities Boost Efforts to Reduce Energy Waste: Here's How They Rank

Scorecard of 51 large cities reveals the top 10, including Boston, NYC, Seattle, Los Angeles, and Portland. Orlando, Phoenix, Los Angeles, San Diego, and Kansas City among those most improved.

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Blog | May 3, 2017

Where does your city rank in the 2017 City Energy Efficiency Scorecard?

Next week we will release the 2017 City Energy Efficiency Scorecard. Because it’s been two years since we published the last edition, here are some key scorecard numbers and facts to jog your memory about its contents.

100: Number of points cities could earn. No city came close to earning a perfect score in a past scorecard. Spoiler alert: it didn’t happen this time either.

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Blog | February 21, 2017

Multifamily energy efficiency spending nearly triples in four years

Today, one in six American households resides in the apartments or condominiums of multifamily buildings. While new multifamily buildings are being constructed across the country, most residents still live in older buildings that are not energy-efficient. ACEEE’s newly released report provides encouraging news for apartment and condo dwellers who want to reduce the cost of their energy bills. Utility-sector energy efficiency programs that serve these buildings have nearly tripled their spending in recent years.

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Blog | January 4, 2017

2017 is looking like a good year for energy efficiency as investments grow

As the new year begins, we expect 2017 will bring increased investments in energy efficiency and other efforts to save energy.

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Blog | November 21, 2016

How to create big opportunities to save energy for small businesses

Given the importance of small businesses to our national economy, ACEEE has examined successful utility program practices in the small commercial segment. We find there are still significant energy efficiency opportunities. Our new paper describes effective program strategies.

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Blog | July 6, 2016

Want to increase your community’s resilience? ACEEE can help

How is energy efficiency connected to community resilience? We answered that question in a report last year, Enhancing Community Resilience through Energy Efficiency. The report found that energy efficiency should be a core resilience strategy because it strengthens energy systems and the communities they serve by providing more reliable and affordable energy.

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Blog | May 20, 2016

Explaining the unique energy burden of low-income households

In a recent report released by ACEEE and Energy Efficiency for All, Lifting the High Energy Burden in America’s Largest Cities, we measured energy burdens in 48 of the largest cities in the United States. Energy burden means the percentage of household income that goes toward energy costs, and we looked specifically at utility energy bills (transportation energy costs are also a significant household expense, but it was outside the scope of the analysis).

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Blog | May 19, 2016

Oakland is living up to California’s high bar on energy efficiency, and then some

Local governments of all sizes can invest days, months, and years into advancing energy efficiency programs and policies. Yet many go unrecognized for their efforts. Because the City Energy Efficiency Scorecard only covers 51 large cities, ACEEE created the Local Energy Efficiency Self-Scoring Tool so that any community can evaluate itself.

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Press Release | April 20, 2016

Report: “Energy Burden” on Low-Income, African American, & Latino Households up to Three Times as High as Other Homes, More Energy Efficiency Needed

Data Gauge Impact of Energy Costs on Low-Income, African-American, Latino, and Renter Residents; Low-Income Households in Memphis, Birmingham, Atlanta, New Orleans, Providence, Pittsburgh, Dallas, Philadelphia, Kansas City, and Cleveland Suffer Heaviest “Energy Burden”  

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Blog | April 1, 2016

Untangling the energy-use knot in cities

“How much energy do cities use?” We get that question a lot. The answer is, excepting a few cities, we generally don’t know. Only a handful of cities publish their energy use, and while the Energy Information Administration collects and reports a lot of great data on state- and utility-level energy consumption, they do not report city-level data.

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