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Blog | September 13, 2017

Multifamily benchmarking can save energy — with the right support

Many cities have started benchmarking initiatives to reduce citywide energy consumption. This could be good news for people living in apartments and condominiums, because many are renters and low-income residents who would benefit from lower energy bills. Low-income families can struggle to find affordable and energy-efficient homes. The apartments they rent are often in need of repairs, have older appliances, and operate with less-efficient heating and cooling equipment, which partly explains their higher energy bills.

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Blog | August 23, 2017

New and improved self-scoring tool can help cities reduce their energy use and carbon emissions

The federal government’s plan to withdraw from the Paris Climate Accord galvanized many cities. Within hours of the announcement, 369 mayors signed on to the Mayors National Climate Action Agenda, which aims to uphold the US commitment to reduce greenhouse gas emissions (GHGs) under the Paris Agreement. So, what comes next for these cities?

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Blog | August 14, 2017

Here’s how Southeastern states can reduce the energy burden of low-income households

Southeastern residents currently face historically high poverty rates, and low-income households spend an average of three times as much on energy bills, as a portion of their monthly income, than other families. Energy efficiency investments could help lower energy bills, but low-income residents in the region often lack access to energy-saving upgrades.

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Blog | August 10, 2017

US cities are starting to expand transportation options for low-income residents

Many urban residents today can choose from a wide range of travel options. Public buses and trains, car-sharing options like Zipcar, on-demand ride-sharing services like Uber and Lyft, and bike-share programs are available in major cities. However, many of these options are not widely available in low-income neighborhoods because they can be physically inaccessible or unaffordable to their residents.

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Blog | May 3, 2017

Where does your city rank in the 2017 City Energy Efficiency Scorecard?

Next week we will release the 2017 City Energy Efficiency Scorecard. Because it’s been two years since we published the last edition, here are some key scorecard numbers and facts to jog your memory about its contents.

100: Number of points cities could earn. No city came close to earning a perfect score in a past scorecard. Spoiler alert: it didn’t happen this time either.

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Blog | January 4, 2017

2017 is looking like a good year for energy efficiency as investments grow

As the new year begins, we expect 2017 will bring increased investments in energy efficiency and other efforts to save energy.

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Blog | July 6, 2016

Want to increase your community’s resilience? ACEEE can help

How is energy efficiency connected to community resilience? We answered that question in a report last year, Enhancing Community Resilience through Energy Efficiency. The report found that energy efficiency should be a core resilience strategy because it strengthens energy systems and the communities they serve by providing more reliable and affordable energy.

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Blog | May 19, 2016

Oakland is living up to California’s high bar on energy efficiency, and then some

Local governments of all sizes can invest days, months, and years into advancing energy efficiency programs and policies. Yet many go unrecognized for their efforts. Because the City Energy Efficiency Scorecard only covers 51 large cities, ACEEE created the Local Energy Efficiency Self-Scoring Tool so that any community can evaluate itself.

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Blog | May 10, 2016

Want to improve your multifamily energy efficiency program? Our new report shows you the way

Multifamily buildings are home to millions of people across the US. In fact, multifamily buildings make up one quarter of the housing stock. These buildings range from duplexes with five or six units to high-rises with more than 50. Most properties are leased to residents, while others are owned by their occupants. Rental buildings can be owned by mom-and-pop landlords or companies that own and operate hundreds of buildings nationwide.

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Blog | April 1, 2016

Untangling the energy-use knot in cities

“How much energy do cities use?” We get that question a lot. The answer is, excepting a few cities, we generally don’t know. Only a handful of cities publish their energy use, and while the Energy Information Administration collects and reports a lot of great data on state- and utility-level energy consumption, they do not report city-level data.

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