eschwass's blog

Today, one in six American households reside in the apartments or condominiums of multifamily buildings. While new multifamily buildings are being constructed across the country, most residents still live in older buildings that are not energy-efficient. ACEEE’s newly released report provides encouraging news for apartment and condo dwellers who want to reduce the cost of their energy bills. Utility-sector energy efficiency programs that serve these buildings have nearly tripled their spending in recent years.

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Demand response and energy efficiency programs are complementary: energy efficiency reduces both energy use and peak demand while demand response provides additional peak demand reductions. In this blog, we use data to illustrate the importance of each, including some new data on actual savings from demand response programs. 

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India, the world's most populous democracy, is making strides toward boosting its energy efficiency. Its efforts include the bulk purchase and distribution of over 200 million LED bulbs (substantially bringing down the price), efficiency standards on several types of appliances, and significant efforts on industrial and agricultural efficiency.

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Art Rosenfeld, a leading physicist and one of the founders of ACEEE, passed away today at age 90. Art began the energy efficiency research program at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) in the 1970s, and was instrumental in training and motivating an entire generation of energy efficiency practitioners. He helped found ACEEE in 1980, was a member of the board of directors until 2013, and has been a member of our Research Advisory Board since then.

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As the US unemployment rate nears a 10-year low, some companies report trouble finding skilled workers. The problem is particularly pervasive, as new data show, in the energy efficiency sector.

More than 80% of employers in this sector report at least some difficulty finding qualified job applicants, and more than 40% indicate it’s “very difficult,” according to the Department of Energy’s second annual energy and employment report released this month.

Yesterday, the Department of Energy (DOE) issued five new efficiency standards, culminating a decade of energy efficiency progress that began under President George W. Bush. The new standards, the last of many developed during the Obama administration, will save consumers money, help meet the nation’s energy needs and reduce environmentally harmful emissions, including greenhouse gases. However, each of these new standards must clear one more hurdle before they are truly complete, which means the Trump administration will get the final word on this last batch of Obama-era standards.