Archive

August 2012

Blog Post | August 28, 2012

New Vehicle Standards to Achieve Major Fuel Savings and Emissions Reductions

The Department of Transportation and the Environmental Protection Agency today finalized federal car and light truck fuel economy and greenhouse gas emissions standards for model years 2017 to 2025. The standards, together with those previously adopted for model years 2012 to 2016, mean an 80 percent increase in fuel economy for the average model year 2025 vehicle from the 2011 CAFE (Corporate Average Fuel Economy) requirement of 27.6 miles per gallon.    

Read More
Blog Post | August 16, 2012

The Economy-Wide Benefits of Residential Feedback Programs

Advanced utility meters (so-called “smart meters”), coupled with in-home displays or feedback devices, provide the means by which residential energy consumers can become more knowledgeable about their energy consumption practices. Such devices enable consumers to become active managers of their own energy use, or in this case, their home electricity usage patterns.

Read More
Press Release | August 14, 2012

American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy Presents 2012 Champion of Energy Efficiency in Buildings Awards

Pacific Grove, Calif.—The American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy (ACEEE) presented four Champion of Energy Efficiency Awards last night at its 17th biennial Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings. The awards recognize leadership and accomplishment in the energy efficiency field. Winners are selected based on demonstrated excellence in program implementation, research and development, energy policy, or private sector initiatives. The winners for 2012 are:

Read More
Blog Post | August 9, 2012

The U.S. Is Going for Gold in the London Olympics, but Falling Behind Other Countries in Energy Efficiency

ACEEE recently published a report ranking the energy efficiency of the world’s 12 largest economies. Unfortunately, the U.S. isn’t even in the running for a top spot.

Read More
Blog Post | August 7, 2012

The Rebound Effect: Real, but Not Very Large

As the energy efficiency of products, homes, and businesses improves, it becomes less expensive to operate them. The rebound effect postulates that people increase their use of products and facilities as a result of this reduction in operating costs, thereby reducing the energy savings achieved. Periodically, some analysts raise questions about the rebound effect, arguing that it is a major factor that needs to be accounted for when analyzing energy efficiency programs.

Read More
Blog Post | August 2, 2012