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State Policy

Press Release | May 1, 2019

ACEEE Says Mahalo to Hawaii for Leadership on Energy Efficiency

Washington, DC — Hawaii’s state legislature approved a bill (HB556) this week that would adopt minimum efficiency standards for common household products including computers, faucets, and showerheads. Governor David Ige is expected to sign the bill into law, saving Hawaiians millions of dollars on their utility bills and billions of gallons of water annually. 

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Blog Post | April 22, 2019

ACEEE debunks the myths behind the Ohio bill that would gut efficiency programs

As the Ohio state legislature holds a hearing tomorrow on a bill that would effectively gut the state’s energy efficiency programs, we want to explain why the bill's special interest supporters are flat out wrong.

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Blog Post | March 11, 2019

Jobs, Jobs, Jobs: New Toolkit Helps Quantify Efficiency’s Benefits

As new studies show energy efficiency is supporting more jobs and attracting more investments, ACEEE today releases a toolkit to help states quantify all the economic benefits of energy-saving programs. Policymakers are increasingly interested in accounting for these benefits but have often found it difficult to do so.

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Blog Post | February 28, 2019

Florida could add 135,000 jobs by embracing five energy policies

New ACEEE research shows that Florida could bolster energy efficiency policies to gain 135,000 jobs, making the state’s economy a bit sunnier.

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Blog Post | January 31, 2019

Electrification and efficiency: crafting an enduring relationship

As more states and cities set aggressive policies toward a carbon-free future, the energy industry is abuzz with the concept of electrification. What does this have to do with energy efficiency? A lot! Although some people may assume that efficiency’s reduction in electric use conflicts with electrification’s increase in load, in fact, energy efficiency is central to many electrification strategies. Like many relationships, it’s complicated. If done right, electrification presents opportunities to advance energy efficiency and its many benefits.

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Blog Post | January 2, 2019

Happy New Year! We look back at 2018’s progress and challenges and forward to 2019’s potential

In 2018, states, cities and companies made progress on energy efficiency, while the federal government took steps backward. This year holds promising opportunities, particularly at the state, city and business level. Unfortunately, we expect a continued need to defend efficiency standards, targets, and funding at the federal level and in a few states.

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Blog Post | December 13, 2018

19 states value clean air, clean lungs in program planning

In a wider push to increase energy efficiency, 19 states are incorporating health and environmental benefits into the cost effectiveness testing of utility-run efficiency programs. Quantifying these advantages is a step towards increased funding and broader program offerings. ACEEE’s new topic brief profiles these states and the unique ways they are accounting for the diverse benefits of efficiency.

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Blog Post | November 1, 2018

What will Massachusetts’ new efficiency targets mean for future policy?

Massachusetts’ new three-year energy efficiency plan includes aggressive energy-savings targets for utilities. The plan, approved Tuesday by the state’s Energy Efficiency Advisory Council and filed for approval with utility regulators, is estimated to cut greenhouse gas emissions and achieve $8.6 billion in customer benefits.

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Press Release | October 4, 2018

ACEEE 2018 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard

States up efficiency investments & power savings; push net-zero buildings & electric vehicles; NJ, CT, CO, SD improve most; MA and CA lead

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Blog Post | September 27, 2018

2018 State Scorecard will look at dramatic twists and turns in energy efficiency

If 2018 were an energy-saving roller coaster, the 2018 State Energy Efficiency Scorecard would be your souvenir photo capturing a year of promising highs and a few stomach-churning lows in efficiency policy.

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