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Blog Post | October 15, 2015

Following the points: A State Scorecard preview

October marks the release of the 9th edition of ACEEE’s State Energy Efficiency Scorecard, and we’re convinced it’s the best one yet. That’s because every year we refine our methodology, getting better and more specific data from states and adjusting our scoring criteria to reflect the changing landscape of energy efficiency. This year, we are making a few big changes, but you’ll still recognize the State Scorecard you’ve come to know.

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Blog Post | October 12, 2015

Air regulators, state energy officials, and the affordable housing community are working together. Here’s why.

EPA’s recently released Clean Power Plan (CPP) requires states to reduce carbon emissions from existing power plants. How states meet their targets will vary, as they are able to choose from a variety of compliance approaches. Many states, however, are well positioned to incorporate energy efficiency into their compliance plans. It’s proven to be a least-cost strategy for utilities, and provides multiple benefits for the customers they serve.

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Blog Post | October 2, 2015

Ohio study committee gets it wrong on energy efficiency targets

On Wednesday, a group of Ohio policymakers released their recommendations to indefinitely freeze the state's clean energy and energy efficiency targets. Their misinformed recommendations, if implemented, would once again deliver a major setback to Ohio energy bill payers and the state's clean energy economy.

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Blog Post | August 10, 2015

New York’s REV: Recent filings show that energy efficiency efforts vary widely

New York State has been a leader in utility of the future efforts and embarked on a major initiative to change how it regulates energy utilities, called Reforming the Energy Vision (REV).

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Blog Post | July 27, 2015

Three cheers for Maryland!

Last week the Maryland Public Service Commission released its long-awaited order on several key energy efficiency issues. The decisions in the order placed Maryland in the forefront of national energy efficiency leadership.

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Blog Post | July 1, 2015

The E2e weatherization study: generating more heat than light

A recent academic working paper on the low-income weatherization assistance program in Michigan, by researchers associated with the E2e project, has created much controversy.

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Blog Post | June 30, 2015

Continuing the conversation on efficiency and the water-energy nexus

How much energy does it take to fill a glass with drinking water? If you take into account the energy to transport the water from its source through the treatment and distribution process and into your faucet, there’s a lot of embedded energy that goes into that glass of water. And that’s not even getting into any energy used in the wastewater treatment process.

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Blog Post | June 23, 2015

Why everyone benefits from energy efficiency programs

Opponents of energy efficiency often make the claim that the only people who benefit from utility energy efficiency programs are program participants. Any energy efficiency improvements those participants are making, they argue, are simply being subsidized by non-participants. Our study finds that is not true; all utility system customers benefit from energy efficiency investment.

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Blog Post | June 18, 2015

States don't need to gamble with EPA rulemaking. Energy efficiency can achieve two-thirds or more of Clean Power Plan targets

A number of state leaders have gone all in, suing the EPA for a rule it hasn't even finalized yet. We've seen a first draft of EPA's proposed Clean Power Plan, but the final rule could change dramatically. One thing that EPA won't change, though, is the language in the Clean Air Act that requires this rulemaking.

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Blog Post | May 29, 2015

Energy efficiency at stake in the Keystone State

There’s a flurry of activity surrounding energy savings goals in Pennsylvania, and what it will mean for energy efficiency will depend on decisions by both regulators and legislators. Pennsylvania first set energy savings goals in 2008, with its Act 129 legislation. The state is now at a key juncture, with the public utility commission (PUC) making a decision soon on the next round of targets.

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